There is More to Maine!

Start your fall leaf-peeping adventure at Portland, the largest city in the state with 64,000 people.  Portland has changed little since the late 1800′s when it was a bustling northern seaport giving merchant’s access to Canada.  As the northern most deep water port, which does not freeze over in winter, it remains an important port today receiving over 70 cruise ships, 200 oil tankers, fishing fleets, and of course lobstermen.  Take a day or two and decompress before your leaf-peeping takes on a life of its own.  See America’s only remaining Maritime Observatory on Munjoy Hill.  Visit Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s boyhood home.  Revel in the luxury of Victoria Mansion.  See great American artist’s paintings at the Portland Museum of Art.

Maine is 90% forested – the most of any state.  With over 200 species of native trees there are spectacular fall color views in every region.  The rugged rock-bound coastline is dotted with islands and many colorful fishing villages.  Time has stood still and it really shows in these quaint villages.  The mountains and streams of Western Maine offer magnificent views of the valleys and lakes below.

Slow down and enjoy the tranquility that permeates Maine.  You may even see a Moose! Visit quintessential New England towns like Camden, with its Mount Battie.  Drive to the top of this nearly 800 foot seaside mountain to experience the majestic views of Penobscot Bay and the small town of Camden at the harbor.  The fall color panoramic view will leave you with lasting memories, just as they did for Edna St. Vincent Millay in 1912, when she penned her poem “Renascence”.

Meander up the coast to Bar Harbor and explore the first National Park east of the Mississippi River – Acadia.  The scenic loop road winds through the park and eventually takes you to the top of Cadillac Mountain.  Scamper over the boulders and rocky trails to see the unusual plant and animal life that lives in this unique geologic area.  Experience sunrise on the mountain and see the first rays of light that hit the eastern shores of the United States of America.
Don’t forget about the lobster and lighthouses – both are abundant and quite enjoyable.


1604 was the year of the first European settlement in Maine.  Over 400 years later there is still a lot to learn about Maine.  Norm Forgey founded Maine Day Trip in 2007, a company that provides private sightseeing tours.  Many educators and other professionals from around the world have toured Maine with them.  Their sightseeing destinations are greatly enhanced with snippets of history and the background of historical landmarks and scenic views.  Fall is the greatest time of the year to meander the coast of Maine.


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