Guest Blog: Living History: Using Historical Fiction in the Classroom

When I initially began writing my novel, Radium Halos- a Novel about the Radium Dial Painters, my intended audience was adults. Over the past two years since its release, I have discovered my novel also appeals to the young adult crowd. Thus began my quest to introduce Radium Halos to students in middle schools and high schools and to teachers as a teaching tool.

Radium Halos is historical fiction, based on the true story of the Radium Dial painters. Who were they? What happened to them? Why is their story important?

Very few people are aware of this tragic, true story from American industrial history, in which teenage and young women factory workers in the 1920s were exposed to radiation, while painting watch and clock dials with radium paint. Although they reported their resulting illnesses to their superiors, they were denied timely medical coverage or compensation.

Students need to make sense of what has happened in history. How can they relate to young people or adults from other centuries and the decisions they made? How did these people in history overcome adversity and learn from their mistakes? What can we learn?

If you are a history or social studies teacher, it’s important for your students to see connections and draw parallels between history and current events. You want to expose your students to as much of our historic past as possible, so they can understand how something that happened decades or centuries ago is still relevant in our present-day lives.

Radium Halos works well with your existing history curriculum, either for middle schoolers (8th-grade) or high school students. A curriculum guide, (available as a free download on my blog- http://livinghistory.librifiles.com/order-books-and-curriculum-guides/) features unit objectives, pre- and post-reading activities, writing assignments, cross curriculum activities for science and/or literature, and student assessments with answer keys. Also included are activities for eBook readers, AP, and special needs students.

Praise for Radium Halos: “Shelley Stout debuts with a novel of characters as compelling as the true story it covers. Like a good reporter, she follows the facts. In this case she not only uncovers a story little known, but more importantly she reveals in her characters, the humanity of a tragic tale.”  -Batt Humphreys, former senior producer for CBS News and author of Dead Weight

Volume discounts available from Librifiles Publishing. http://librifiles.com/publications/radium-halos-by-shelley-stout/

To find out more, please visit my blog for teachers and students:
http://livinghistory.librifiles.com/
Book trailer on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COLVBAReSZ0
Find me on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/cxlszhx
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/sstoutwriter
Radium Halos on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/cl48v6e

Shelley Stout is a former teacher and published author of short stories, novels, magazine articles, and blogs. She presents workshops to teachers and enjoys being a writing mentor and tutor for children and adults. Shelley is available to speak to students via Skype.

5 Responses to Guest Blog: Living History: Using Historical Fiction in the Classroom

  1. Pingback: How To Select an eBook Reader | My Ebook Reader

  2. I do consider all of the ideas you’ve offered on your post. They’re very convincing and will definitely work. Nonetheless, the posts are too short for starters. Could you please lengthen them a bit from subsequent time? Thanks for the post.
    my website is on family vacation ideas.

    • markmolloy says:

      Thanks so much for your feedback. I am glad you enjoyed the post. We do not have any length guidelines for our guest bloggers, so they will be of varying length.

      We did post the author’s contact information, so you most certainly can contact the person directly.

      I appreciate your feedback and I also appreciate the time and effort our bloggers put into their posts.

      Please check back in the future!

      Thanks again!

  3. Tamra says:

    I want to say thanks a whole lot for the job you have made in writing this posting. I am hoping the same most reliable job by you later on too.

  4. good job thanks for the submit